The Edmond Sun

Arts & Entertainment

September 23, 2013

Racism, sex and drugs: Here are 10 frequently-banned books

Banned Book Week, September 22-28, celebrates the "freedom to read" and promotes awareness of censorship in schools and libraries. Here are 10 of the more well-known challenged books, out of the hundreds listed by the American Library Association.

 

 

What are the top reasons books are banned or challenged? Offensive language, sexual content, religious material and content deemed "inappropriate for the age group."

"The Catcher in the Rye", J.D. Salinger,

"The Catcher in the Rye," is frequently removed from classrooms and school libraries because it is “unacceptable,” “obscene,” “blasphemous,” “negative,” “foul,” “filthy,” and “undermines morality.”

"Uncle Tom's Cabin," Harriet Beecher Stowe

The historically accurate representation of the treatment of slaves in America has resulted in multiple challenges from would-be censors.

 

 

"Daddy’s Roommate," Michael Willhoite

The book, which deals with having a homosexual parent, was the second most challenged book in 1990-1999. "Heather Has Two Mommies" by Lesléa Newman, portrayed the same scenario with a lesbian couple and was also among the top ten most challenged books of the 90s.

"I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings," Maya Angelou

Maya Angelou's 1969 autobiography, dealing with issues like rape and racism, is among one of the most banned books in the United States.

"The Great Gatsby," F. Scott Fitzgerald

Often called the great American novel, "The Great Gatsby" is among the most challenged and banned books. Would-be censors cite "language and sexual references" in the book.

"The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian," Sherman Alexie.

Sherman Alexie's young adult novel has been drawing attention for depictions of sexuality, racism, violence, substance abuse and poverty.

"Fahrenheit 451," Ray Bradbury

The dystopian novel about censorship and the burning of books ironically makes the list for most challenged books in America.

Venado Middle school in Irvine, Calif. allowed only a version of the book in which all the “hells” and “damns” were blacked out. Other challengers have complained the book violated their religious beliefs.

"The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn," Mark Twain

Twain's book remains one of the most challenged of all time, with objectors claiming the book promotes racism and contains offensive language.

"Howl and other poems," Allen Ginsberg,

Depictions of homosexuality have earned "Howl" a number of challenges.

Harry Potter (series), J.K. Rowling

Every book in the wizarding series of novels has been challenged, primarily by religious groups believing the book's magical world to be Satanic.

Text Only
Arts & Entertainment
  • GooGooDolls.jpg Coming in August: The Goo Goo Dolls

    Tickets for the Aug. 5 concert, which are priced at $45.50 and $59.50, go on sale 10 a.m. Friday, April 25.

    April 19, 2014 1 Photo

  • Woolaroc Woolaroc unveils story of the West

    The museum at Woolaroc has been referred to as “the Smithsonian of the West.”  It’s full of art and artifacts pertaining to western history and the southwestern region of the United States. So why is there an elephant’s head on one wall?
    To understand about the elephant, you have to know a bit about Frank Phillips, one of the founders of Phillips Petroleum. The company was incorporated in 1917 by Frank and his brother L.E.

    April 18, 2014 1 Photo

  • brisket2.jpg Food Network show visits Guthrie for ’89er Days

    Guthrie’s annual ’89er Days Celebration provides a variety of activities for people to enjoy including a carnival, rodeo, parade and lots of food vendors.
    This year, visitors at the 84th annual event, which runs Tuesday through Saturday, will notice an added bonus when a film crew from the new television series “Carnival Eats” will be in town filming for its inaugural episode.

    April 15, 2014 1 Photo

  • Drama troupe plans Good Friday performance

    Spirit Act Drama Troupe of First United Methodist Church, Edmond will present the passion play, “Christus” by Alison Spitz on Good Friday.

    April 14, 2014

  • mama rabbit 4-15 Good Reads

    NOTE: Email dpeery@edmondsun.com to have your name entered into a drawing for the following titles: “Taking Care of Mama Rabbit” and/or “Cheesie Mack Is Not Exactly Famous” Deadline is 10 a.m. April 21. Winner will be notified by return email. Winner is responsible for picking up the book at The Edmond Sun at 123 S. Broadway. All entrants must be 18 or older to win.

    April 14, 2014 3 Photos

  • Dillingham 1 Andersons provide enchanting afternoon with Dillingham

    Mo and Richard Anderson recently showcased the musical and performing talents of UCO's Ambassador in Residence Kyle Dillingham in a concert at their Edmond home.

    April 11, 2014 2 Photos

  • Stepping forward: The real Colbert

    Letterman changed the late-night TV game between his run on NBC's "Late Night" and starting the "Late Show" franchise in 1993. And while it's tough to replace a pop-culture icon, Colbert, in terms of pedigree and sense of humor, makes the most sense.

    April 11, 2014

  • VIDEO: CBS taps Colbert as Letterman’s Late Show successor

    Bloomberg’s Jon Erlichman reports that CBS has announced Stephen Colbert as its choice to replace the retiring David Letterman as host of “The Late Show” on Bloomberg Television’s “Lunch Money.”

     

    April 10, 2014

  • Where's Mommy 4-8 Good Reads

    NOTE: Email dpeery@edmondsun.com to have your name entered into a drawing for the following titles: “Where’s Mommy?” and/or “Say It Ain’t So!” Deadline is 10 a.m. April 14. Winner will be notified by return email. Winner is responsible for picking up the book at The Edmond Sun at 123 S. Broadway. All entrants must be 18 or older to win.

    April 8, 2014 3 Photos

  • ‘ACM@UCO Rocks Bricktown’ features Moby as headliner

    The Academy of Contemporary Music at the University of Central Oklahoma (ACM@UCO) will take over Oklahoma City’s Bricktown district with more than 70 ACM@UCO student bands in 14 venues as a part of its fifth annual “ACM@UCO Rocks Bricktown” event. The live music starts at 3 p.m.  April 11, with a “Sound Mixing for Feature Film” panel at 1 p.m. All events are free and open to the public.

    April 7, 2014