The Edmond Sun

Business

April 1, 2014

Brogdon says he stands for liberty

GUTHRIE — The biggest threat to liberty and economic prosperity is coming from Washington, D.C., said former state Sen. Randy Brogdon, a candidate for U.S. Senate to replace retiring U.S. Sen. Tom Coburn.

“No more debt. No more spending. No more borrowing money,” Brogdon said Monday night to the American Legion in Guthrie.

The federal government is $17 trillion in debt. Government over reach is so powerful that it involves itself in the daily lives of Americans, he said.

“For every single tax payer in the United States of America, we have this debt choking noose around our neck of almost $160,000,” said Brogdon, R-Owasso. “That’s staggering. We’ll never have the opportunity to pay that off is we don’t stop creating new debt.”

Brogdon said he expects his Republican opponents to share their voting record. Other Republicans who have announced their intentions to run for the U.S. Senate being vacated by U.S. Sen. Tom Coburn include Congressman James Lankford, R-Edmond; and former Oklahoma Speaker of the House, state Rep. T.W. Shannon, R-Lawton.

Democratic state Sen. Connie Johnson, D-Oklahoma City, is considering entering the Senate race, she announced.

“We have a candidate in this race that voted three times in the last three years to raise the debt ceiling,” Brogdon said. “Just in the last three years, Rep. Lankford voted to increase the debt ceiling by $4.5 trillion.”

Money paid on the federal debt is applied to pay for spending already spent by the federal government, President Barack Obama said. Congress is paying for its bills.

Speaker of the House John Boehner and the Republican establishment’s irresponsibility has left every American, including children, owing $54,000 to the federal government, he said.

“First thing I’m going to do is say, ‘I’m not voting for Mitch McConnell. One of you guys, Mike Lee, Ted Cruz, Rand Paul, run against him.’”

Congress cares very little about repealing the Affordable Care Act or the NSA spying on Americans, Brogdon said. Lankford has voted more than 40 times to stop the ACA. Lankford supported spying on Americans by funding the NSA, Brogdon said.

“Most of us remember the day when you could go to the airport and make a mad dash to get on the plane a half-hour before it takes off,” Brogdon said.

He said today that is impossible as people are asked to remove their shoes and belts and have their wives and daughters “manhandled” by government security agents.

“I remember a time when we didn’t have to worry about the federal government listening in to our phone conversations and reading our emails,” Brogdon said. “Those days are over in America.”

Brogdon said Shannon’s claims that he led the fight to reduce the state’s debt and reduce the size of government does not match Shannon’s voting record.

“He voted for budgets that increased spending in Oklahoma over the last three years by almost $1 billion — $800 and some odd million,” Brogdon said.

Shannon has voted for bond indebtedness by voting three times to create the $25.5 million American Indian Cultural Center, Brogdon said.

In 1994, the state of Oklahoma created the Native American Education and Cultural Authority. This state agency was empowered to manage and construct the cultural center. The state Centennial Project was supposed to be completed by 2007.

Senate Bill 1651 would appropriate $40 million from the state’s Unclaimed Property Fund, which would be matched with $40 million pledged by non-federal and non-state sources to finish the project.

The bill was passed by the state Senate and is now being considered by the House.

“Last year alone, T.W. Shannon presided over a $300 million increase in the state’s budget,” Brogdon said.

If elected to the U.S. Senate, Brogdon said he will continue his long battle for state’s rights. A federal judge has no authority in Oklahoma to define marriage, he said.

Brogdon said he would offer legislation to get rid of the EPA. He also said there is no separation by church and state.

“The federal government has nothing at all to say at any level about what goes on in our schools or churches in the state of Oklahoma — period,” Brogdon said. “But what do we do? We let them maneuver us because they give us a little bit of money for education if we do what they want us to do.”

Brogdon said voters have a chance to make a difference in the world. He will not go to Washington, D.C., and be the father of legislation unless it’s tearing it apart, he said. He is in the race for one reason — to preserve liberty, Brogdon said.

“I intend on making Sens. Ted Cruz and Mike Lee look like moderates before I’m through,” Brogdon said.

Candidate filing for 2014 statewide elections is set for 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. April 9-11 at the state Capital. Voters will nominate their party’s candidates on June 24 for the statewide primary election.

A runoff primary election is set for Aug. 26. The general election is scheduled for Nov. 4.

TO LEARN MORE about Randy Brogdon, visit www.randybrogdon.com.

 

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