The Edmond Sun

Z_CNHI News Service

January 24, 2014

Obama's battle plan against inequality: Hold back the successful

Editor's note: CNHI newspapers that are not weekly subscribers to Taylor Armerding's column may publish this one if they notify him at t.armerding@verizon.net.

They say the best way to ensure nothing gets done about a problem is to form a committee. To that we should add that the best way to ensure that a lot of money gets spent, but not much gets done about various perceived social problems, is for government to declare a war on them.

President Lyndon Johnson made his grandiose declaration of a War on Poverty 50 years ago. About $20 trillion later, while his Democratic descendants claim its success, they also decry continuing unconscionable levels of poverty.

Remember the War on Drugs? The legalization of pot is spreading throughout the land. Who’s winning that, uh, war?

The first lady declared war on obesity. Not much different since the war began that I can see, except for some rallies and blogs in support of “fat pride.”

And so it is, and will go, with the War on Inequality, which President Obama says will be his main focus in the coming year – perhaps for the rest of his term if he continues to need a distraction from ongoing “glitches” and “surprises” embedded in Obamacare.

A lot of government money will get spent. A tremendous amount of hot air will issue forth about “more fortunate” people failing to “pay their fair share.” And little will change.

Hillary Clinton, the full-time non-candidate for president, checked the “inequality outrage” box several months ago with a clarion call to “reverse this tide of inequality that is eating away at the social fabric of our country.”

After which she revealed the specifics of her and her former-president husband’s vast personal wealth and bewailed how disconnected she is from the lives of average people … oh, wait.

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