The Edmond Sun

Oklahoma State House

November 24, 2013

Tornado duck to face winter alone

MOORE — Some residents are worried about a feathered tornado survivor who is struggling with the falling temperatures.

Several visitors at Little River Park have been feeding a duck that survived the May 20 storm. As the weather turned cold, some have become worried about it and have contacted animal rescue organizations and the Moore Parks and Recreation Department.

However, the animal may be on its own.

“We are aware of the duck,” said Todd Jenson, director of Parks and Recreation. “We do not do anything in cases like this because we are not trained in that area. We would not know what to do.”

Likewise, an animal aid organization that has helped hundreds of wild animals after the storm is short-staffed and can’t embark on a rescue mission.

“We have heard about this duck,” said Rondi Large of WildCare Foundation, which is headquartered in Noble.

However, unless the duck is taking a turn for the worse, there is not much that can be done for it.

“We take in over 5,000 animals a year so it is hard for us to also go to the field and catch animals. Is it that this duck is injured more than before or that the water is being drained? If either situation is occurring, than we would be glad to accept the duck,” Large said.

WildCare’s mission is to provide people a place to bring native wildlife struggling to survive with the goal of releasing healthy animals back into the wild.

“We mend the mission so we can also help domestic ducks since they have no place to go and get care,” Large said. “If this duck does need help, we would be glad to accept it and do what we can.”

The Little River Park duck is not the only wild animal that was injured and struggled after the May tornados.

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Oklahoma State House