The Edmond Sun

September 4, 2013

Rotary invites superintendent to share Edmond facts, figures

Patty Miller
The Edmond Sun

EDMOND — The Edmond Rotary welcomed Edmond School District’s Superintendent David Goin Wednesday as he shared education facts and figures.

“Edmond citizens are justly proud of our outstanding public school system,” said Rotarian Dan Chavez. “Our young people rank high statewide in educational accomplishment. The availability of excellent schools is one of the most attractive features of our community for potential newcomers and longtime residents alike.

“Part of the success of our school system is stable and progressive leadership. David Goin was first appointed superintendent in 1999, and is now in his 14th year as leader of the system. He came to us in 1994, first as director of elementary education, and then associate superintendent before undertaking his current responsibilities.”

Goin began his teaching career in Moore and then undertook administrative roles in that city and in Norman before coming to Edmond.

In 2005, Goin was honored by the Edmond Area Chamber of Commerce as Outstanding Community Leader, has been named to the OU College of Education Hall of Fame, was the Oklahoma Association of School Administrators Administrator of the Year in 2009, and was the recipient of the Institute of Interfaith Dialog Education Award in 2011.

The Edmond School District is the fourth-largest public school district in Oklahoma, serving more than 22,500 students and employing more than 2,500 people.

“We have 16 elementary schools with the most recent, Frontier Elementary, opening this fall,” Goin said. “We will add yet another member to the EPS family of schools with Heritage Elementary scheduled to open in the fall of 2014. Heritage is now under construction at 400 E. Sorghum Mill Rd. Its opening will address growth precipitated expansion to relieve crowded conditions at existing schools in the northern quadrant of the school district.

A sixth middle school is now being planned for construction next year with anticipated opening the fall of 2015-2016.

In addition to three high schools, the district has Boulevard Academy, an alternative school and Project Hope, for dropouts that includes a credit recovery program. Goin said a fourth high school is in the planning stages, but might be postponed for a year if a bond issue being planned including storm shelters, at schools which at this time have none, is passed.

“Every building built since 1990 has shelter space,” Goin said. “Nine schools do not have shelter spaces. The board adopted a goal in July to look at a special bond item to provide shelters at all schools. The cost for this would be between $26-30 million.”

Goin added any shelter spaces that are added must serve a double-duty and be used during the school day as a gymnasium, hall spaces or cafeteria.

“Our mission is to empower all students for success and we take that charge very seriously,” Goin said. “We know too, that nothing is more valuable to the success of our “shared children” than the partnerships we forge between school, home and community. Together, we have the opportunity to move from a vision of exceptional educational opportunities for our children to a reality of excellence across the spectrum of services afforded our young people in the year to come.”            

By the numbers

16 elementary schools, 11,250 total population; smallest population, 280-plus (Russell Dougherty and Clegern); and largest population, 1,100-plus (Cross Timbers)

4 off-site pre-kindergarten classes at local pre-schools

5 middle schools, 5,050 total population; smallest population, 2,100 (Memorial); largest population, 2,500 (North)

Total student population, 23,150 students (up 650 from last year)

23 percent free and reduced lunches in 2008; 27 percent in 2013

1,661 certified teachers and assistants

91 site and district administrators

979 support personnel

$943 million net assessed property value in 2005-2006

$1.55 Billion in 2013-2014

23.7 ACT district average; 20.7 state average and 21.1 national average

2210 students passed Advanced Placement Tests in 2012, the most among Oklahoma school districts