The Edmond Sun

Education

December 9, 2013

Deer Creek looks at remediation percentages of college-bound students

EDMOND — During Monday’s school board meeting, members of the Deer Creek Board of Education will be looking at the district’s rate of students requiring remediation upon entering college. The numbers are based on a 2011 report. The board meets at 6 p.m. tonight at the district's administration building.

The 2011 Remediation Rates of Oklahoma High School Graduates in Oklahoma Public Higher Education were presented showing the comparison of Deer Creek High School graduates with surrounding school districts as well as districts in like size.

With 115 seniors in the Deer Creek 2011 class, seven students (6.1 percent) needed remediation in English compared to a state average of 18.9 percent. In math 18 students, or 15.7 percent, needed remediation compared to 38 percent statewide. In reading three students (2.6 percent) needed remediation compared to 7.1 percent in the state.

Among programs used to enhance mathematics are the junior and senior mathematics course to support College Algebra, Common Core State Standards Curriculum involving mathematical reasoning and data tracking in the professional learning community.

In other business, school board members were expected to vote on the General Fund Account Payable and Payroll, the Building Fund Account Payable and the Child Nutrition Account Payable and Payroll.

Business items to be discussed will include a possible March bond issue and the possible vote to approve a resolution calling on the Oklahoma Legislature to create a Special Funding Situation for pension liability in the State of Oklahoma.

Members also will discuss with a possible vote to approve two Board of Education policies including the use or possession of illegal chemical substances, alcohol and tobacco and the restrictions on use of tobacco products.

The Treasurer’s Report for Nov. 30, includes beginning of month assets of $8.56 million with collections totaling $2.5 million for a balance as of $11 million.

Checks paid totaled $4.8 million for an end balance of cash on hand for the month of November of $6.3 million.

Policy regarding the use of tobacco on school properties was approved Nov. 10, 1986, and states Deer Creek School District is tobacco free. Tobacco products are prohibited on all school property 24 hours per day.

The new wording states “Tobacco is defined as cigarettes, cigars, pipe tobacco, snuff, chewing tobacco and all other kinds and forms of tobacco prepared in such a manner to be suitable for chewing, smoking or both, and includes e-cigarettes/vaping devices or any other product packaged for smoking or the simulation of smoking.”

The policy was last amended Aug. 11, 2008.

 

1
Text Only
Education
  • Ekso 1.jpg Deer Creek students see bionic suit in action

    In 2010, a car accident left Guthrie resident Mary Beth Davis paralyzed from the waist down.
    In a few weeks, thanks to INTEGRIS Jim Thorpe Rehabilitation, determination and an Ekso Bionics suit, she will be walking across a stage to receive a college diploma from Oklahoma State University.
    Wednesday afternoon, Davis was at Deer Creek Middle School where students of teacher Jamie Brehm got to see Davis and the suit in action and learn about how it helps people live a fuller life.
    Brehm said the opportunity to have the demonstration fit perfectly with the testing schedule. Brehm said a bonus was having Davis with her inspirational story come to the school. In addition to graduating soon, Davis lives an independent life and she was recently crowned Ms. Wheelchair Oklahoma.

    April 23, 2014 1 Photo

  • Be on the lookout for termites

    Warming temperatures and spring rainfall means swarming conditions for the homeowners’ nemesis in Oklahoma — the termite.
    Termites are Mother Nature’s way of recycling dead wood, as well as aerating the soil and increasing its fertility and water percolation. They are an important food source for other insects, spiders, reptiles, amphibians and birds within the food web, and they are essential for the wellbeing of the environment.

    April 23, 2014

  • earth day 7.jpg Central community learns about water conservation

    Edmond residents know about rain that falls from their roofs after a storm. Some may not know what kind of important role it plays in the nation’s water supply.
    Tim Tillman, the University of Central Oklahoma’s sustainability coordinator, said UCO has a tradition of innovation in sustainable practices. Tillman said Earth Day, first brought to the campus more than 20 years ago, began that tradition.
    During Tuesday’s Earth Day Fair, Jason Summers, a Coca-Cola account manager for on-premise sales, was giving away rain barrels and educating members of the Central Oklahoma community about the benefits of rain barrels.

    April 22, 2014 3 Photos

  • Accountability push for public schools now in question

    One by one, K-12 education reforms passed in previous years by Oklahoma lawmakers are being targeted for weakening or repeal.
    Among them: Common Core State Standards, the Reading Sufficiency Act, A-F school grades for districts, and middle-school end-of-instruction exams for history and social studies. These could all be scaled back or revoked by various legislative bills that have passed in both the House and Senate.

    April 22, 2014

  • State suspends student testing over glitches

    Computer glitches forced state education officials to suspend online testing Monday, affecting student testing in Edmond and Deer Creek.
    State Superintendent Janet Barresi said as a result of online testing disruptions for students in grades 6-8 and high school end-of-instruction (EOIs) exams she directed testing vendor CTB/McGraw Hill to suspend online testing for the day.
    “We certainly share in the frustration that students and school districts feel,” Barresi said. “It is of paramount importance that CTB finds the nature of the problem and resolves it as quickly as possible.”

    April 21, 2014

  • Guthrie board calls for Common Core repeal

    A resolution recently passed by the Guthrie school board calling for the repeal of Common Core standards has attracted the attention and support of several state legislators.
    State Reps. Lee Denney, R-Cushing, Dale DeWitt, R-Braman, Jason Murphey, R-Guthrie, and state Sen. AJ Griffin, R-Guthrie, praised the school board for weighing in on the Oklahoma Legislature’s pending action to repeal state-issued Common Core standards.

    April 21, 2014

  • Touch-A-Truck event draws families to UCO

    Edmond Electric and Edmond Vehicle Maintenance are co-hosting the Edmond Touch-A-Truck from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. May 17 in the UCO parking lot off Second Street. Touch-A-Truck is a fundraising event that provides children of all ages with the opportunity to experience life-size vehicles and interact with community support leaders like police officers, firemen, construction workers and many more. Families will have the opportunity for a hands-on exploration of many vehicles such as Edmond’s own fire trucks and police cars, an Edmond Electric bucket truck and even a solid waste truck.
    Admission for the Touch-A-Truck event is a suggested $2 donation with the proceeds going to the Edmond HOPE Center. For more information, contact Edmond Electric at 216-7671 or email michelle.gumaer@edmondok.com.

    April 21, 2014

  • Biggest student loan profits come from grad students

    This week, the Congressional Budget Office projected that the federal government would earn roughly $127 billion from student lending during the next 10 years.

    April 19, 2014

  • Dr. Fielding’s variance denied by close vote

    Reverse-angle parking will continue at the 13 N. University Drive office of Dr. Brad Fielding. The Edmond City Council rejected a variance request by the local optometrist to end the city’s pilot project in front of his medical facility.
    Councilman Nick Massey and Councilwoman Victoria Caldwell supported Fielding’s variance request that was dismissed in a 3-2 vote.
    Four parking lines were striped late last year at Fielding’s business after the city opened new bicycle lanes along University. The city cites the safety for bicyclists and motorists who traditionally depart while backing into traffic as the main reasons for introducing reverse-angle parking.

    April 15, 2014

  • Sequoyah Sequoyah names students of the month

    Sequoyah teachers chose the following students as students of the month for being good role models, conscientious students, diligent workers, and respectful individuals

    April 12, 2014 1 Photo