• Updated

First Assistant District Attorney Joshua C. King was sworn in Monday morning as the new Cherokee County associate district judge.

Advocates for clean water protections plan to gather Tuesday by the scores in Oklahoma City to oppose a proposed rule that would make procedural changes for granting variances to water standards.

  • Updated

STILILWATER – Baylor senior Makai Mason scored four points during the final minute to sink the Oklahoma State men’s basketball team Monday night.

  • Updated

Oklahoma State University is preparing to welcome dockless electric scooters back to its campus beginning on Jan. 22 after banning them in October. OSU Sr. Vice-president for Administration and Finance Joe Weaver cited concerns about safety due to their speed and problems with users parking them in places that blocked crosswalks and buildings and prevented people with disabilities from being able to safely cross the street or use facilities when he booted them from campus.

  • Updated

Kyler Murray’s declaration for the NFL Draft on Monday doesn’t indicate he’ll choose football over baseball, but it does officially draw the curtain on his time at Oklahoma.

  • Updated

Payne County Facilities Authority listened to a presentation Monday on the use of excess sales tax funds to pay for medical treatment for Inmate X, and potential repayment by the Hallett fund, a/k/a the Medical Expense Liability Fund. The three county commissioners also serve as the trustees of the authority. Undersheriff Kevin Woodward made a presentation concerning the medical expenses of James Clyde Jenkins III.

  • Updated

The Joplin Globe's annual high school journalism workshop is a learning opportunity for everyone — our editorial board included.

  • Updated

Kyler Murray is a man of few words. He wrote one sentence Monday that helped clarify his athletic career moving forward.

  • Updated

Rocklahoma is set to take place on Friday, May 24, Saturday, May 25 and Sunday, May 26, 2019 at “Catch The Fever” Festival Grounds in Pryor, Oklahoma, just outside Tulsa. Now in its 13th year, America’s Biggest Memorial Day Weekend Party will feature performances from some of today’s top rock artists, including: Ozzy Osbourne, Disturbed, Shinedown, Bush, Seether, In This Moment, Steel Panther, Jackyl, Asking Alexandria, and many more.

  • Updated

Out in the universe, billions of light years beyond our galaxy, astronomers have recently begun detecting quick, powerful blasts of radio waves called fast radio bursts. Nobody knows precisely where they are coming from or why they occur.

  • Updated

We hope those putting the spending plan together will work with each other to best meet the varied needs of Oklahoma.

OKLAHOMA CITY — County jails in Oklahoma County and Woods County have sent DNA samples from new arrestees to Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation, the result of a controversial law passed in 2016 that only just got off the ground late last year.

It seems crazy that this year, of all years, Kansas' streak of Big 12 regular season would come to an end.

  • Updated

West Virginia entered as the Big 12’s fifth-best rebounding team, but still made a living on the glass in a 66-55 victory against the Sooners on Sunday. OU was outrebounded 46-35, including 19-8 on the offensive glass.

Oklahoma will get an infusion of new blood in its executive branch on Monday as its 28th governor is sworn into office — we hope he makes us a Top 10 state and follows through on promises made on the campaign trail. 

  • Updated

Oscar Jeffers, Jr. owned a Ford auto dealership in Wagoner during the 1950s, but his passion was racing American Quarter Horses. Known as “June” to friends and family (short for Junior), Jeffers had long sought a mare that could produce a champion. His wife Zelma shared his passion and together they purchased a Texas mare called Mur L. They bred her to an American Quarter Horse Hall of Famer named Three Bars. They named the foal Mr. Bar None.

  • Updated

I've been visiting Club Lunch pretty regularly since I started working in the area. Since it's just down the street from the office, it makes for a leisurely lunch hour to stroll down the street, pop in, get a warm welcome and an equally warm roast beef plate, and sit down to enjoy myself.

NORMAN — Shortly after state Sen. Paul Scott, R-Duncan, announced he intended to file legislation that would end Oklahoma's "Soon-To-Be-Sooners" program in December, which provides pregnancy and maternity services to low-income Oklahomans, he received criticism on his political Facebook page.

  • Updated

January’s flower is the carnation. In the cut flower industry, it probably takes a back seat only to the rose. Long-stemmed, cutting carnations are hybrids from Dianthus caryophyllus – an old world flower native to the limestone regions of Southern Europe. The genus’ origin speaks of its Mediterranean heritage. Di and anthos mean Zeus’s flower.

  • Updated

Equine athletes – those beautiful horses who compete in races, rodeos and other events – can suffer any number of medical issues. One common affliction that causes lameness in these animals is bone spavin, or degenerative joint disease. Arising from various factors, bone spavin destroys the joint cartilage in the bottom two joints of the hock.

Thinking about quitting tobacco in the new year? The Oklahoma Tobacco Helpline, a program of the Tobacco Settlement Endowment Trust, provides FREE resources to Oklahomans who are thinking about quitting tobacco, currently quitting tobacco, former tobacco users wanting to stay tobacco-free and those who want to support loved ones or patients.

  • Updated

My son Quinn virtually dragged me to see “Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse.” I went along because, as a father, it is my job to be interested in what he is interested in, but I thought I was over the Spider-Man origin stories. I was tired of the spider bite. Of the “Oh look, I have superpowers” realization and the “you have to learn to embrace who you are” storyline. It had gotten trite.

  • Updated

There’s always good and bad when it comes to flu season, but we’re much better off than we were this time last year.

  • Updated

ENID, Okla. - Former Oklahoma State wide receiver Josh Stewart has signed with the Oklahoma Flying Aces indoor football team.

  • Updated

State transportation officials have yet to schedule a public hearing to get input from Muskogee residents about ideas to address the growth of freight transportation on U.S. 69.    

  • Updated

OKLAHOMA CITY — The organization that became the Oklahoma City Thunder has already retired five numbers: No. 1 (Jack Sikma), No. 10 (Nate McMillan), No. 19 (Lenny Wilkens), No. 24 (Spencer Haywood) and No. 32 (Freddy Brown).

  • Updated

Oklahoma forward Jamuni McNeace started his first game since suffering a right ankle sprain before the Dec. 4 win over Notre Dame at Madison Square Garden in New York City.

  • Updated

PAWNEE – The impact of the federal government’s shutdown, which entered its 21st day on Saturday and is affecting an estimated 800,000 workers, is being felt locally by the people who provide services to Native American tribal members. Many of the affected workers have relationships with the tribes through Indian Health Service, which provides federal health services to Native Americans and Alaskan Natives and the Bureau of Indian Affairs, which is part of the U.S. Department of the Interior.

When people move to different parts of Oklahoma, or to other states, they often find customs different than what they were accustomed to in their previous place of residence — even more so when living in a foreign country.

  • Updated

It was a historic day in December when we celebrated the final removal of more than 10,000 tons of nuclear waste that have plagued Sequoyah County and its citizens for decades. More than 500 semitractor-trailer loads removed the dangerous substances from the former Sequoyah Fuels Corporation site near Gore. Our Cherokee Nation Attorney General’s office and Secretary of Natural Resources office collaborated with the Oklahoma Attorney General’s office to undertake this immense task.

The holidays are in the history books. Most folks have taken down their Christmas trees and ornaments, rolled up the strings of lights from the eaves of their houses, consumed the leftovers, and figured out where to store another round of useless knick-knacks fobbed off on them by well-meaning relatives.

This Week's Circulars